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plant pathogens host:bugs.bio.usyd.edu.au

Listing 1 - 10 from 16 for plant pathogens

Plant Pathology: Plant Diseases Overview
... reducing spread rate intercropping mulching OVERVIEW OF PLANT DISEASES The vast majority of plant pathogens are fungi Link to Fungal Biology, however, plant diseases are also caused by insects, bacteria, nematodes ... A blister-like spore mass breaking through a plant epidermis. Rot Disintegration of tissue, often caused by enzymes or toxins produced by pathogens. Rust Rust-coloured pustules formed by ...
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Plant Pathology: Infection Process: Plant Defenses
... > PLANT DEFENSES Plant pathogens fall into two broad categories: necrotrophs (those that kill plant cells before parasitising them), and biotrophs (those that obtain nutrients from living cells). Failure of pathogens to invade suitable host cells (dead in the case of necrotrophs; alive for biotrophs) will prevent them from infecting the host and the plant will be resistant ...
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Plant Pathology: Infection Process: Plant Defenses: Genetics of Resistance
... plant plasma membrane for most fungal pathogens, and within the plant cell for bacterial and viral pathogens. In bacterial biotrophs such as Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas, which are extracellular plant pathogens ...
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Plant Pathology: Disease Management: Biological Control
... fungal plant pathogens in the soil and on the plant surface. The hyphae of parasitic fungi penetrate their victim, sometimes with the aid of wall-degrading enzymes. Bacteria on the plant surface and in the soil are also known to parasitise plant pathogens, such as other bacteria and fungal spores. Predation of plant pathogens by invertebrates can also contribute ...
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Plant Pathology: Disease Management: Cultural Management Practices
... indirect effects on the spread of plant pathogens, although, some forms of inoculum can be spread extensively during tillage. Tillage can bury pathogens in the topsoil in deeper where ... attack by pathogens that unhealthy plants would. However, many pathogens also thrive under ideal growth conditions, particularly biotrophic pathogens, such as viruses. The major nutrients that influence plant and ...
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Plant Pathology Introduction
... use the future Cultural Management Practices reducing inoculum reducing spread rate intercropping mulching Plant Pathology Introduction Because of the reliance of humans on plants for food, ... growth, physiological functioning and productivity of a plant, manifesting outwardly as visible symptoms. Parasitic organisms that cause disease are called pathogens. Please note: this site is designed using ...
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Plant Pathology Glossary
... Image. Defensins antimicrobial proteins that inhibit the growth and development of pathogens. Plant defensins are found throughout the plant kingdom and are released upon seed germination, creating an antimicrobial environment around ... legal restriction of the transport of plants and/or plant parts in order to prevent the spread of pests and pathogens. In order to accomplish this plants may be held ...
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Plant Pathology: Infection Process
... pathogens. Top ENTRY Pathogens exploit every possible pathway to enter their host, although individual species of pathogen tend to have a preferred method. Fungal pathogens often use direct penetration of the plant ... structures, and many of the pathogens that utilise wounds to enter the plant are unable to penetrate the plant surface otherwise. Most plant viruses entrer through wounds, such ...
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Plant Pathology: Infection Process: Plant Defenses: Passive Defenses
... the vacuoles of the plant cell, becoming active when hydrolase enzymes are released following wounding or infection. Some pathogens are able to release enzymes that detoxify plant saponins, making them insensitive to this line of defence. Conversely, resistance of some plants to specific pathogens is the ...
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Mycology - Plant Interactions - Introduction
... plant. Pathogens simply exploit the plant. These interactions are complex. Not only does the plant function as a source of energy, but the plant may provide signals that enable symbionts (and pathogens ...
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