Plant species

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host tissue host:ohioline.osu.edu

Listing 1 - 10 from 16 for host tissue

Verticillium Wilt of Strawberry, HYG-3012-95
... to differentiate from those caused by other root infecting fungi. Isolation from diseased tissue and culturing the fungus in the laboratory are necessary for positive disease identification ... tissue. The destruction of water-conducting tissue results in reduced water uptake by the plant; thus, the plants wilt and wither. As fungal colonies get older they produce microsclerotia in infected host tissue ...
ohioline.osu.edu

Bacterial Crown Gall on Ornamentals in the Landscape, HYG-3054-96
... first is softer than the normal host stem or root tissue. The galls consist of disorganized host tissues. Secondary galls sometimes form above ... smaller and occur as separate or unbroken elongated masses of tissue breaking through the bark surfaces. Unlike insect galls, crown galls are a solid mass of tissue all the way through. Disease Development Crown gall is caused by ...
ohioline.osu.edu

Black Root Rot of Greenhouse Floral Crops, HYG-3066-96
... There are also methods to culture the fungus from the tissue. Since the pathogen grows slowly onto the culture plate, ... the fungus is very common and widespread. It has a wide host range and affects many other hosts besides greenhouse floral crops ... or nearly so. Thielaviopsis produces resistant "resting" spores on infected host tissue in tremendous numbers. These spores can be splashed about or ...
ohioline.osu.edu

Peach Leaf Curl, HYG-3006-94
... cool, wet spring weather the conidia infect new leaves as they emerge from the buds. Host plant tissues are susceptible for only a short period. As the tissues mature they become ... the weather is cool and wet. Low temperatures are thought to retard maturation of leaf tissue, thus prolonging the time infection may occur. The fungus can penetrate young peach leaves readily ...
ohioline.osu.edu

White Apple Leafhopper, HYG-2202-92
... into plant cells and remove the contents. As sap is sucked from the leaves, green tissue is destroyed causing foliage to become speckled or mottled with white spots. Heavy feeding may ... potato leafhopper walks sideways as well as forwards and backwards. Potato leafhopper has a wide host range, including potatoes, beans, and alfalfa. Potato leafhopper develops throughout the year in the southern ...
ohioline.osu.edu

Bacterial Crown Gall of Fruit Crops HYG-3301
... . Ellis Crown gall is caused by the bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This bacterium has the widest host range of any plant pathogen. It is capable of causing tumors, or "galls," on virtually ... ) in galls, or in the soil. When they come in contact with wounded tissue of a susceptible host, they enter the plant and induce gall formation, thus completing the disease cycle. The ...
ohioline.osu.edu

Botrytis Bunch Rot or Gray Mold of Grape, HYG-3025-95
... vineyard, as well as on a multitude of alternate plant hosts. Because of its wide host range, growers always should assume that the fungus is present in the vineyard. In spring ... , the spores germinate and colonize dead flower parts. Using the dead tissue as a food base, the fungus invades living tissue. After penetrating the berry, the fungus may remain dormant until the ...
ohioline.osu.edu

Green Apple Aphids, HYG-2206-94
... Quaintance and Baker 1917, USDA Farmers Bulletin 804 Feeding by green apple aphid on succulent tissue of bearing and nonbearing trees can lead to leaf curling, stunting, and distorted tip growth ... lay overwintering eggs. Natural Control Aphid populations are affected by weather, the quality of their host plant, and natural enemies. Aphid reproduction slows down when temperatures are high or when the ...
ohioline.osu.edu

Verticillium Wilt of Landscape Trees and Shrubs, HYG-3053-96
... raspberries and strawberries, to tomatoes and potatoes. Some of the many common woody ornamental host plants include ash, barberry, catalpa, elm, magnolia, maple, Russian olive, redbud, smoketree, tuliptree, and ... small leaves, stunting, poor annual growth, and sparse foliage. Sometimes large areas of cambial tissue die from infections by the fungus and opportunistic fungi such as Nectria develop in ...
ohioline.osu.edu

Phomopsis and Kabatina Tip Blights of Junipers, HYG-3056-96
... lesions often girdle branch tips and cause blighting of foliage beyond the diseased tissue. Small, black, spore-containing fungal fruiting bodies develop in the lesions. Use a ... resistance of several Juniperus selections to Phomopsis and Kabatina tip blight. Host Disease Resistance Rating* Host Disease Resistance Rating* Juniperus chinensi Phomopsis Kabatina Juniperus scopulorum Phomopsis Kabatina ...
ohioline.osu.edu