Plant species

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fruit species host:www.hort.cornell.edu

Listing 1 - 10 from 14 for fruit species

Cornell Fruit Resources, Cornell University
... are good for landscaping as well as fruit. Cornell Gardening Page Cornell Fruit Resource Page More minor fruit resources: North American Fruit Explorers Fruit, Berry, and Nut Inventory Book from Seed ... and Saskatoon, there are more than 25 species native to North America. Cornelian Cherries - The only species of dogwood that produces edible fruit, Cornelian Cherries deliver twice as much Vitamin ...
www.hort.cornell.edu

Cornell Fruit Resources, Cornell University
... and green-fruited respectively. 'Early Sulfur' - Yellow, hairy fruit with good flavor, but susceptible to mildew. 'Catherina' - Large green fruit. 'Achilles' - Large red fruit. Sources of gooseberry and currant plants can be ... that lie along the ground as well as branches that are diseased or broken. Ribes species produce fruit at the base of one year old wood. Fruiting is strongest on spurs of ...
www.hort.cornell.edu

Cornell Fruit Resources, Cornell University
... tolerant and produce fruit reliably in frost pockets and exposed areas. Three species are commonly grown in the Northeast: Black mulberries (M. nigra) produce the most flavorful fruit but are ... been selected for their foliage for silkworms (this species was originally imported from China to feed silkworms), several also have excellent fruit. 'New American' is considered the best, but 'Trowbridge', ...
www.hort.cornell.edu

Cornell Fruit Resources, Cornell University
... Cornell Department of Horticulture Cornelian Cherries Cornus mas Minor Fruits Home Page Cornelian cherry fruit This small, upright to spreading, 15- to 20-foot-tall tree bears small yellow ... fruits that are larger and sweeter than the species; and 'Golden Glory', which has upright branching and bears large, abundant flowers and large red fruit. Pests Generally pest free. Copyright, Department ...
www.hort.cornell.edu

Cornell Fruit Resources, Cornell University
... Horticulture Beach Plums Prunus maritima Minor Fruits Home Page Beach plum fruit Beach plums in bloom Beach plum fruit Beach plum fruit Beach plum flowers Beach plums in native habitat Beach plums ... these fruits. For more information, see Cornell Beach Plum Project website. Other lesser-known Prunus species include: Western sand cherries (Prunus besseyi)- Small, spreading shrubs up to 4 feet tall ...
www.hort.cornell.edu

Cornell Fruit Resources, Cornell University
... are in the same family as elderberries. The size and color of the fruit are the only thing this species shares in common with commercial cranberries, Vaccinium macrocarpon. Bushes grow to ... highbush cranberries are sold simply as the species, but some cultivars are available. 'Wentworth', 'Andrews', and 'Hahs' were selected for their high quality fruit. Viburnum opulus, the European cranberry bush, ...
www.hort.cornell.edu

Cornell Fruit Resources, Cornell University
... small gooseberry. They ripen in July, but may remain on the bushes, and if any fruit remains after frost and bird feeding, they can still be gathered anytime during winter. Buffaloberries ... are smaller, more slender and have stalked buds arranged in less compact clusters. A related species, the russet buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis) is thornless, but has bitter, sour berries. Pests Birds enjoy ...
www.hort.cornell.edu

Cornell Fruit Resources, Cornell University
... Cornell University Search Cornell Department of Horticulture Quinces Cydonia oblonga Minor Fruits Home Page Quince fruit Quince fruit Quinces are small, irregularly shaped trees growing to about 15 feet tall that ... to make jelly. Harvest fruit -- a good source of pectin -- when they are golden yellow. Don't confuse these quinces with several other quince-like species grown for ornamental purposes. ...
www.hort.cornell.edu

Cornell Fruit Resources, Cornell University
... fruit crops which continue to grow in popularity and develop market share in the New York fruit production industry. These specialty fruits include species of ribes (currants, gooseberries, and jostaberries), aronia, elderberry, beach plum, hardy kiwi, persimmons, pawpaws, mulberries, medlars, etc. See also the Cornell Minor Fruit ...
www.hort.cornell.edu

Cornell Fruit Resources, Cornell University
... fruit nursery list Ribes Cultivar Review The following are descriptions of common varieties of currants and gooseberries suitable to New York conditions. The regulation on growing ribes species ... site is designed to meet communications needs identified by the Cornell Fruit Program Work Team. Comments? Email Juliet Carroll, Fruit PWT Web Subcommittee chair, or Craig Cramer, Communication Specialist, ...
www.hort.cornell.edu