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formic acid

Listing 1 - 10 from 16 for formic acid

Crazy Ant, Paratrechina longicornis (Latreille) (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
... but the crazy may bite an intruder and curve its abdomen forward to inject a formic acid secretion onto the wound. The body has long, coarse, well scattered, suberect to erect, grayish ...
edis.ifas.ufl.edu

Florida Carpenter Ant, Bull Ant, Tortugas Carpenter Ant, Camponotus floridanus (Buckley) and Camponotus tortuganus (Emery) (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Subfamily ormicinae: Tribe Camponotini)
... to 20 mm in length. There is no sting, but workers can bite and spray formic acid for defense. The thorax is evenly convex; a key characteristic of carpenter ants. The thorax ...
edis.ifas.ufl.edu
More from this site

The Story of Orchids - The North of England Orchid Society
... their enemies, the ants increase the acidity on the plant through their own use of formic acid as a defence system. When it comes to reproduction orchids are extremely versatile, but individually ...
orchid.org.uk

Precipitating macromolecules with organic solvents
... that it precipitates phospholipids. Precipitating proteins from acids Formic acid is a common solvent for partial acid hydrolysis and CNBr digestions. Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid is a common deglycosylation reagent. Although proteins ... use an ice bath and small volumes because neutralization is exothermic. For specific formic acid and peptide CNBr mapping protocols see - Skopp, R.N. and Lane, L.C. ...
plantpath.unl.edu

Reed College Canyon: Plants
... stems with opposite, lance-shaped leaves and it's covered with tiny hairs that inject formic acid into the skin. The stinging sensation can last for several days. Touch-me-not is ...
web.reed.edu

Sarracenia, Carnivorous Plants Online - Botanical Society of America
... , making them a lure to flies who are probably also attracted by the decaying amino acid odor of already trapped prey. Once the fly enters the hollow leaf, it confronts a ... ), the ant dies and decays, thus releasing the formic acid made by the ant (formic acid results in the nasty stings some ants can cause). The formic acid contributes further to the digestive process, making the ...
www.botany.org

In The Grow - July 2006
... , hollow hairs in stinging nettle contain several irritating substances, such as histamine, serotonin, acetylcholine and formic acid. These substances, coupled with the hairs' ability to scratch the skin and mucus membranes, result ...
www.hort.purdue.edu

Pinus strobus L
... by white pine in the central Appalachian Mountains (45). These soils are weathered from acid shales and sandstones, either in place (residual soils), deposited on lower slopes (colluvial material ... foliage; Zimmerman pine moth (Dioryctria zimmermani); the Allegheny mound ant (Formica exsectoides), which injects formic acid into the tree tissue; pales weevil (Hylobius pales), which feeds on bark of ...
www.na.fs.fed.us

vegetable gardening in spring
... rather than starch as in potatoes. Many people find they have a slight 'formic acid' (ant) taste to them. Those who like them-well, like them. ... in a papery husk. They are slightly sweet, have moderately high acid, and a slightly soapy overtone. You either like them or loath them ... , but remember to add some lime, as lettuces don't like acid conditions.If you have sown seed direct in the garden, thin ...
www.naturalhub.com

Stinging Nettle Information
... acid due to the thicker skin. Back sides of hands, arms, legs and most other areas of the body are usually affected. The acid is formic acid, the same acid ants have in their saliva glands. Like any acid, it can be neutralized ... in a bucket of water for 24 hours released the formic acid into the water. The stems were then removed and ...
www.naturepark.com