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Flora Library > News & Articles

 

Forest & trees

  • Climate change is giving old trees a growth spurt - Larch trees in the permafrost forests of northeastern China -- the northernmost tree species on Earth -- are growing faster as a result of climate change. A new study of growth rings from Dahurian larch in China's northern forests finds the hardy trees grew more from 2005 to 2014 than in the preceding 40 years.
  • Oldest known trees in eastern North America documented - A stand of bald cypress trees in North Carolina, including one least 2,624 years old, are the oldest known living trees in eastern North America and the oldest wetland tree species in the world. They show evidence of severe flooding and drought during colonial and pre-colonial times.
  • Non-native invasive insects, diseases decreasing carbon stored in US forests - Scientists have found that non-native invasive insects and diseases are reducing the amount of carbon stored in trees across the United States.

News & articles

  • Discovery of a bottleneck relief in photosynthesis may have a major impact on food crops - Scientists have found how to relieve a bottleneck in the process by which plants transform sunlight into food, which may lead to an increase in crop production. They discovered that producing more of a protein that controls the rate in which electrons flow during photosynthesis, accelerates the whole process.
  • Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying? - Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research. The study found that plant circadian rhythms regulate the sensitivity of plants to a widely used herbicide according to the time of day. The findings could benefit agriculture by reducing crop loss and improving harvests.
  • Climate change 'disrupts' local plant diversity, study reveals - Researchers have discovered that the numbers of plant species recorded by botanists have increased in locations where the climate has changed most rapidly, and especially in relatively cold parts of the world.