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Flora Library > News & Articles

 

Forest & trees

  • How bats relocate in response to tree loss - Identifying how groups of animals select where to live is important for understanding social dynamics and for management and conservation. In a recent study, researchers examined the movement of a maternity colony of big brown bats as a response to naturally occurring tree loss.
  • Was early stick insect evolution triggered by birds and mammals? - Stick and leaf insects are a strikingly bizarre group of insects with a worldwide distribution. They are famous for their impressively large body size and their remarkable ability to camouflage themselves as twigs, leaves or bark in order to hide from potential predators. A team of international researchers has now generated the first phylogenomic tree of these insects.
  • Managed forests in New Hampshire rich in carbon - A new study examining carbon stocks in an actively managed mixed wood forest in New Hampshire finds that places with more trees have more carbon stored in both the trees and the soil. The findings demonstrate the connection between above ground and below ground carbon, which has implications for forest management strategies.

News & articles

  • Carnivorous plant study captures universal rules of leaf making - Leaves display a remarkable range of forms from flat sheets with simple outlines to the cup-shaped traps found in carnivorous plants.
  • Plant death may reveal genetic mechanisms underlying cell self-destruction - Hybrid plants, which produced by crossing two different types of parents, often die in conditions in which both parents would survive. Certain hybrid tobacco plants, for example, thrive at 36 degrees Celsius, but die at 28 degrees Celsius, which is the temperature at which both parents would thrive. Researchers have begun to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which hybrid tobacco plant cells meet their demise.